Extra Coordinate Systems, 'Geoms', Statistical Transformations, Scales and Fonts for 'ggplot2'
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% Generated by roxygen2: do not edit by hand
% Please edit documentation in R/coord_proj.r
\name{coord_proj}
\alias{coord_proj}
\title{Similar to \code{coord_map} but uses the PROJ.4 library/package for projection
transformation}
\usage{
coord_proj(proj = NULL, inverse = FALSE, degrees = TRUE,
ellps.default = "sphere", xlim = NULL, ylim = NULL)
}
\arguments{
\item{proj}{projection definition. If left \code{NULL} will default to
a Robinson projection}
\item{inverse}{if \code{TRUE} inverse projection is performed (from a
cartographic projection into lat/long), otherwise projects from
lat/long into a cartographic projection.}
\item{degrees}{if \code{TRUE} then the lat/long data is assumed to be in
degrees, otherwise in radians}
\item{ellps.default}{default ellipsoid that will be added if no datum or
ellipsoid parameter is specified in proj. Older versions of PROJ.4
didn't require a datum (and used sphere by default), but 4.5.0 and
higher always require a datum or an ellipsoid. Set to \code{NA} if no
datum should be added to proj (e.g. if you specify an ellipsoid
directly).}
\item{xlim}{manually specify x limits (in degrees of longitude)}
\item{ylim}{manually specify y limits (in degrees of latitude)}
}
\description{
The representation of a portion of the earth, which is approximately
spherical, onto a flat 2D plane requires a projection. This is what
\code{coord_proj} does, using the \code{proj4::project()} function from
the \code{proj4} package.
}
\details{
\if{html}{
A sample of the output from \code{coord_proj()} using the Winkel-Tripel projection:
\figure{coordproj01.png}{options: width="100\%" alt="Figure: coordproj01.png"}
}
\if{latex}{
A sample of the output from \code{coord_proj()} using the Winkel-Tripel projection:
``
\figure{coordproj01.png}{options: width=10cm}
}
}
\note{
When \code{inverse} is \code{FALSE} \code{coord_proj} makes a fairly
large assumption that the coordinates being transformed are within
-180:180 (longitude) and -90:90 (latitude). As such, it truncates
all longitude & latitude input to fit within these ranges. More updates
to this new \code{coord_} are planned.
}
\examples{
# World in Winkel-Tripel
world <- map_data("world")
world <- world[world$region != "Antarctica",]
gg <- ggplot()
gg <- gg + geom_cartogram(data=world, map=world,
aes(x=long, y=lat, map_id=region))
gg <- gg + coord_proj("+proj=wintri")
gg
# U.S.A. Albers-style
usa <- world[world$region == "USA",]
usa <- usa[!(usa$subregion \%in\% c("Alaska", "Hawaii")),]
gg <- ggplot()
gg <- gg + geom_cartogram(data=usa, map=usa,
aes(x=long, y=lat, map_id=region))
gg <- gg + coord_proj(
paste0("+proj=aea +lat_1=29.5 +lat_2=45.5 +lat_0=37.5 +lon_0=-96",
" +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +ellps=GRS80 +datum=NAD83 +units=m +no_defs"))
gg
# Showcase Greenland (properly)
greenland <- world[world$region == "Greenland",]
gg <- ggplot()
gg <- gg + geom_cartogram(data=greenland, map=greenland,
aes(x=long, y=lat, map_id=region))
gg <- gg + coord_proj(
paste0("+proj=stere +lat_0=90 +lat_ts=70 +lon_0=-45 +k=1 +x_0=0",
" +y_0=0 +ellps=WGS84 +datum=WGS84 +units=m +no_defs"))
gg
}